Two Mini Reviews: The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor and Long Distance

Two mini graphic novel reviews that I promise I will keep short and sweet!

And there’s a theme beyond them being two middle-grade/lower YA graphic novels, I swear.

The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor by Shaenon Garrity

🌺🌺🌺🌺🌺/5

On a dark and stormy night, Gothic romance-obsessed Haley sees a stranger drowning in the river. Of course she decides to help him, but suddenly she’s transported into what seems like the setting of a Gothic romance novel! There’s a brooding lordling, his two brothers—the poet and the spendthrift—a ghost only she can see, a glum housekeeper, and a mysterious mystery in the dark stone walls of the manor. But things aren’t quite what they seem…

Okay, this was fantastic. It was a brilliant send-up to Gothic romances and the various novels mimicking them. It was both parody and homage that went straight from fantasy to science fiction, complete with metaphysical pocket dimensions, a blorb monster and some other wonderful things.

Definitely a quick, fun read if you’re looking for a graphic novel to spark joy. The illustrations are fabulous and the adventure is rollickingly entertaining and bunnies-to-the-rafters funny.

I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.

The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor releases July 20, 2021.

Long Distance by Whitney Gardner

🌺🌺🌺🌺/5

Vega is downright upset when her parents up and move from Portland, Oregon, to Seattle—mostly because she’s leaving behind her best (and only) friend, and she’s convinced she’ll never make another friend again. But when her dads ship her off to Friend Camp (a place for lonely introverted children like herself), Vega soon begins to realize that things aren’t exactly what they seem.

Another fun, quick read. I’m going to keep it short and sweet because this is one that is best experienced knowing as little as possible so that you fully appreciate the twist.

However, the themes of friendship are strong, along with the idea that it’s okay to change and move and grow as a person, and that your friendships will change and move and grow as well. Long distance friendships take work and won’t always look the same as they did when you lived close by, and that’s okay—and it’s okay to make new friends, too. And it’s okay if you feel uncomfortable in your own skin and that you’re different—there are friends who will like you for who you are and appreciate your quirks and traits and loyalty.

I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.

2 thoughts on “Two Mini Reviews: The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor and Long Distance

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s